Category Archives: Uncategorized

Week 16-17 Final Exam

Week 16-17

May 8-15

Our final exam will be Thursday, May 10 (multiple-choice test on grammar, AP style, news judgment) and Tuesday, May 15 (written test on ledes and a news story).

Tuesday, May 8

Review of Trial stories:

  • Lede should capture the essence of what happened in court that day
  • In court stories, virtually every fact needs attribution

Study Tools:

News lede basics:

  • Construct one sentence (two at the most) that captures the most important thing that happened
  • Write in complete sentences (no headline style)
  • Do NOT start a lede with the time element; tuck that before or after the verb

Feature lede basics:

  • Find an image, anecdote, scene or character that captures the essence of the story
  • Write a lede that SHOWS what the story is about
  • Write a nut graph that explains what the story is about, why it’s important and ideally why you are writing this story now

Write a lede from this SFPD press release.

San Francisco Chronicle lede

San Francisco Examiner lede

 

 

Advertisements

Week 15

Week 15 May 1-May 3

Tuesday: Eportfolio training

Today you will create or add to an eportfolio you will use throughout your time at SFSU — and possibly beyond. This is a place to showcase work you do in class for potential employers and for Journalism Department evaluators.

Log in to SFSU Portfolium here (https://sfsu.portfolium.com/) using the SFSU login.

Examples:

Annie Geiser

Gracie Ngo

Nicholas LaBarbera

Rebecca Schupp

Garrett Bergthold

Simple multimedia tools for your final project:

13 incredible tools for creating infographics

Google MyMaps — make an interactive map of key points

TimelineJSmake a timeline with photos, text and video

Infogram — create beautiful charts, maps, graphics

Google Drawings — create graphics

Thursday: We’ll review for the two-part Final Exam, which will take place on May 10 and May 15.

Week 13 Developing a Reporting Plan

April 17-19

This week we’ll be talking about your final projects and looking at some examples of similar types of stories.

Developing a Reporting Plan:

Focus statement

List of questions

Who can answer those questions?

List of sources

Thursday, April 19:
News quiz

2018 Pulitzer Prizes

Neighbors split over unauthorized La Pulguita flea market, San Francisco Examiner

Transbay Transit Center, San Francisco Chronicle

Final Project Checklist:

  • Main story
  • Sidebar, infographic, infobox, slideshow, video or map

What your final story should include:

  • Strong lede that captures the essence of the story and makes readers want to read more — may be news lede but probably a feature lede
  • Nut graph (may be 2-3 paragraphs) that explains what the story is about and why readers should care
  • Statistics (when possible) — how big, how many, how much?
  • Financials — how much does this cost?
  • History, background, context
  • Multiple points of view — at least 6 sources, including officials, experts, regular people with varying perspectives
  • Strong quotes that capture opinion and context
  • Description of the scene, the place, the person
  • Characters — look for a main character who will help you tell the story

Week 12 Breaking News

April 10-12

Tuesday: Breaking News Exercise

Press Release
San Bruno Police Chief Ed Barberini press conference

Brent Andrew, a spokesman for Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital press conference

Sundar Pichai statement:

, CEO, Google

There are no words to describe the tragedy that occurred today. & I are focused on supporting our employees & the community through this difficult time together. Thank you to the police & first responders for their efforts, and to all for msgs of support.

, CEO, YouTube

Tweet:

There are no words to describe how horrible it was to have an active shooter today. Our deepest gratitude to law enforcement & first responders for their rapid response. Our hearts go out to all those injured & impacted today. We will come together to heal as a family.

Facts:

San Bruno is located about 12 miles south of downtown San Francisco in San Mateo County.
YouTube’s headquarters is at 901 Cherry Avenue, directly west of San Francisco International Airport (SFO). It encompasses about 200,000 square feet, and YouTube leases the building from Gap, Inc., according to a 2017 article in the San Francisco Business Times.

YouTube is San Bruno’s largest employer, with more than 1,100 employees working on campus.

Google and YouTube occupy more than 1 million square feet of office space across several buildings in the 90-acre area, according to the San Francisco Business Times. Google paid $88 million for two nearby buildings in 2016, and YouTube said in 2017 it planned to add more than 400,000 more square feet of office space in the coming years to accommodate its growth.

The campus includes a number of amenities, including a basketball court, outdoor eating areas and a lap pool, according to Google.

Thursday: Discussion of breaking news assignment and follow up

News quiz

How would you have reported the YouTube shooting?

Who would you have tried to interview?

Student stories

Professional stories:

The New York Times

Associated Press

KRON4

Week 11 Final project pitch meeting/Reporting on courts

Tuesday, April 3: Final project pitch meeting. Be ready to pitch two ideas for your final project.

We’ll also discuss your crime stories.

Deadspin video

Thursday, April 5: Reporting on courts

Here’s the agenda for today:

News Quiz

Writing the court story

Sybrina Fulton court testimony

Here are some examples of trial stories with the San Francisco Chronicle’s coverage of the Yusef Bey IV trial:

Opening statements: Prosecutor: Evidence links bakery, Bailey killing

Eyewitness testimony: Chauncey Bailey killing described by witnesses

Devaughndre Broussard testimony:
Chauncey Bailey killer takes stand in murder trial

Chauncey Bailey shooter laughed at killings

Antoine Mackey testimony: Chauncey Bailey murder defendant testifies

Closing arguments: Bakery defense calls star witness a murdering liar

Conviction: Your Black Muslim Bakery leader guilty of murder

Tips for covering a trial:

  1. Write a lede that sums up the highlight(s) of the day in court (often a news lede, occasionally a feature lede)
  2. Look for moments of drama, surprise, emotion
  3. Translate jargon
  4. Include both (or all) sides
  5. Get direct quotes
  6. Use proper attribution
  7. Include background information about the crime:
  • Name of victim(s)
  • Name of defendant(s)
  • Date and location of crime
  • Charges
  • Name of court (San Francisco Superior Court, Alameda County Superior Court, etc.)
  • Possible sentence
  • What is the question in this case?

Week 10 Crime and Breaking News

March 28
Covering Crime and Breaking News

Announcements:
NLGJA Connect: Apply by April 17

ONA Student Newsroom: Apply by March 29

Scholarships:

Scholarship Workshops: Get help applying for Journalism Department Scholarships

  • Wed., Mar. 28, 2-3 p.m. in HUM 308
  • Mon., Apr. 9, 2-3 p.m. in HUM 308

NABJ Scholarships

 

Police Reports:

SFPD CrimeMaps

SFPD News Releases

How to obtain a police report from SFPD

Oakland Crime Map

Oakland PD News Releases

 

Thursday: Dashka Slater.

Read The 57 Bus. Post 10 Questions for Dashka Slater to iLearn.

For next week: Profile is due

Week 8 News Features and Profiles

March 15
Agenda:
New Quiz
Discussion of finding and citing studies and reports.
Examples:
Tips for quoting studies:
  • When citing a study, be sure to cite the original source, not a secondary source such as a news organization (unless the news organization conducted the study). Include where the research was done (“San Francisco State University psychologists have found” or according to a study by Harvard researchers), when it was done, in what forum it was published or presented. If relevant, include number of research subjects.
  • Try to interview researchers involved in the study.
  • Think critically about the source of the study. Do the researchers have a conflict of interest (example: a pharmaceutical company study of a drug)? If so, explain that.
  • When the study is a big part of the story, find other researchers to comment on the research. Does this confirm previous findings? Is the work ground-breaking?
March 13

Agenda for today: Finding a subject for your final project

Look for an issue or trend in your neighborhood.
Examples:
How to find a story:
  • See what’s been written before about your neighborhood
  • Talk to key sources (merchants association leader, aide to district supervisor or city council member, local historian)
  • Look for a major event that is happening or going to happen (opening of new shopping center, tearing down of a historic landmark, opening or closing of a business or housing development that will change the neighborhood in important ways)
  • Look for a trend
  • Look for a new initiative (new free bikes program, anti-crime program, public transit change)
Finding a story in data
See if you could find a story about your neighborhood in this home sales data map.

Final Project Checklist:

  • Main story
  • Sidebar, infographic, infobox or map

What your final story should include:

  • Strong lede that captures the essence of the story and makes readers want to read more — may be news lede but probably a feature lede
  • Nut graph (may be 2-3 paragraphs) that explains what the story is about and why readers should care
  • Statistics (when possible) — how big, how many, how much?
  • Financials — how much does this cost?
  • History, background, context
  • Multiple points of view — at least 6 sources, including officials, experts, regular people with varying perspectives
  • Strong quotes that capture opinion and context
  • Description of the scene, the place, the person
  • Characters — look for a main character who will help you tell the story
Discussion of final projects. Example:

VIDEO: http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/100000002543563/the-changing-mission.htm

Example:

TEXT STORY: Dorm Living for Professionals Comes to San Francisco

Week 7 Library Resources and Public Records

This week we’ll discuss how journalists use and access public records.

Tuesday, 3/6:
Every time a government agency spends money, investigates or evaluates something or counts something, there’s a public record. All citizens, not just journalists, have access to these records.

California Public Records Act

The People’s Business, A Guide to the California Public Records Act

Exemptions to the California Public Records Law

Some examples of public records:

San Francisco Health Department Restaurant Inspections

Sacramento Bee State Worker Salary Database

Some examples of stories using public records:

Newark Advocate: Restaurant Inspections

He earned $540,000 working at two California jails. Was that too much?

The final tally is in — UC’s highest one-year payout for sex harassment settlements, Marjie Lundstrom, Sacramento Bee

When looking for public records, think:

  1. What record might a government agency have?
  2. Which agency or department keeps the document?
  3. Who is the custodian of that document?
  4. Ask for the document(s). Be specific about what you want.
  5. If you are denied access, note the name of the person who is denying access and ask them to cite the law enabling them to withhold the record.  If you are certain of your legal right to access the document, point to the law and ask the custodian to refute it. Take notes.
  6. If you are looking for a document held by a state or local government agency (police, state board of health) use the Student Press Law Center’s State OPen Records Law Request Letter Generator.
  7. State and federal government agendies each have a set number of days (between 3 and 20 working days) from the time the written request is received to supply the document or offer a valid legal reason for withholding it.
  8. During the countdown, continue to call or visit the custodian of the record and issue reminders of the upcoming deadline.
  9. If at the end of the waiting period, you still have not received the records or have received an insufficient response, contact a media law expert.

 

Thursday 3/8:

On Thursday we’ll meet  Nicole Allensworth, the librarian assigned to work with the Journalism Department.

Here is the webpage she has created for the Reporting class. It includes links to many of the agencies you’ll need to access for your public records assignment, due March 15. You can find more information about accessing public records in California from the Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism.

 

 

 

Week 6 Field Trip to City Hall

On Feb. 27 we will meet at 2 p.m. at San Francisco City Hall, 1 Dr Carlton B Goodlett Place. Please come to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors chambers, Room 250, on the second floor. Here is a map and directions: http://sfgsa.org/index.aspx?page=1175.

Please try to get there on time so you’ll get to see the whole meeting. The meeting will probably go till 5 p.m. or beyond. You don’t have to stay for the whole thing but please plan to spend at least three hours there.
From SFSU, the best way to get to City Hall is to take the M-Oceanside inbound/downtown to the Civic Center station and then walk west on Grove and north on Polk Street. You can’t miss City Hall, it’s the grand building with the dome.
If you plan to drive, metered parking is available on Van Ness, McAllister, Grove, and Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place. A CityPark underground parking lot is located on McAllister, between Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place and Larkin. For driving directions, please see the directions here, or visit Google Maps.

The agenda is available online. Please review it before coming to the meeting.

You are expected to write a 350- to 500-word news story about one item on the board’s agenda and post it to iLearn by 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 28. Remember to include your source list (with names and contact info for all your sources) at the end of the assignment.

 

 

Week 5 Covering Events and Meetings

Week 5: Feb. 20-22
Tuesday: Covering Events

Why do journalists cover events? What are you trying to convey?

What to include:

  • A lede that captures the mood and spirit of the event
  • Who, what, where, when and why (either in the lede or the nut graph)
  • Quotes from organizers
  • Background/history (is this an annual event? how did it start? who organized it?)
  • Size of crowd (estimate, get crowd estimates from organizers, police)
  • Vignettes
  • Scenes
  • Quotes from participants
  • Capture the sights, smells, sounds, tastes of the event; use evocative description to make the event come alive

Event story ledes

You can start with a news lede like this:

Hundreds of thousands of onlookers, thousands of participants and an incalculable number of firecrackers filled the streets of downtown San Francisco and Chinatown to celebrate the Year of the Horse with the annual Chinese New Year Parade on Saturday evening.

Full story at: https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Chinese-New-Year-Parade-draws-hundreds-of-5239523.php

or a feature lede like this:

Streets were so packed for Saturday night’s annual Chinese New Year Parade that Andrew Loukas had to use his grandson as a periscope.

“I can’t see anything,” said Loukas, who stood with his grandson George on his shoulders amid the throng at Powell and Geary streets.

“I can see dragon heads and fish,” George reported. “There’s weird people in weird hats in a car.”

“Thanks,” Grandpa said.

With tens of thousands of people lining the route, other viewers climbed on mailboxes, trashcans and Chronicle news boxes, while many peered out from department store and apartment building windows.

The full moon and clear skies drew the multitudes that stayed away from the soggy spectacles of years past. It was a perfect night to watch a dragon dance, a trumpeter trumpet and a beauty queen smile beatifically.

Full story at: https://www.sfgate.com/living/article/S-F-Chinese-New-Year-parade-of-dragons-3251846.php

Where to find events:

http://sf.funcheap.com/events/san-francisco/

http://www.sftravel.com/article/san-francisco-festivals-and-events-february

http://www.sftravel.com/article/san-francisco-festivals-and-events-march

Possible events for you to cover:

Saturday, Feb. 24 Chinatown Community Street Fair
Chinese New Year Parade
Chinese New Year Treasure Hunt
Sunday, Feb 25 Chinatown Community Street Fair
Saturday, March 3 Black Cuisine Festival
Sea Chantey Singalong Aboard Historic Ship
Saturday, March 10 Many Voices, One Art Bay Area Choral Festival
Saturday, March 17 St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Festival

 

 

Thursday: Covering Meetings

Profile pitches
San Francisco Board of Supervisors
Before next Tuesday’s class look at the Board of Supervisors’ meeting agenda for 2/27. 

Try to find a couple of issues that look interesting.

Here are some examples of coverage of the Board of Supervisors:

Legislation is introduced:

San Francisco Moves to End Nickel-and-Diming of Criminal Defendants

SF Board of Supervisors introduces legislation to eliminate criminal justice fees

It’s not Columbus Day in SF anymore — supes switch to Indigenous Peoples Day

Giants hit home run with San Francisco supes: Board OKs huge housing plan

For next week: Field Trip to San Francisco Board of Supervisors Meeting

On Tuesday, Feb. 27 we will meet at 2 p.m. at San Francisco City Hall, 1 Dr Carlton B Goodlett Place. Please come to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors chambers, Room 250, on the second floor. Here is a map and directions: http://sfgsa.org/index.aspx?page=1175.

Please try to get there on time so you’ll get to see the whole meeting. The meeting will probably go till 5 p.m. or beyond. You don’t have to stay for the whole thing but please plan to spend at least three hours there.
From SFSU, the best way to get to City Hall is to take the M-Oceanside inbound/downtown to the Civic Center station and then walk west on Grove and north on Polk Street. You can’t miss City Hall, it’s the grand building with the dome.
If you plan to drive, metered parking is available on Van Ness, McAllister, Grove, and Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place. A CityPark underground parking lot is located on McAllister, between Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place and Larkin. For driving directions, please see the directions here, or visit Google Maps.

The agenda is available online. Please review it before coming to the meeting.

You are expected to write a 350- to 500-word news story about one item on the board’s agenda and post it to iLearn by 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 28. Remember to include your source list (with names and contact info for all your sources) at the end of the assignment.